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Couponclipping lessonpage

Coupon Clipping

Are coupons always a good deal?

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Coupon Clipping

Are coupons always a good deal?

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Couponclipping lessonpage
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Are coupons always a good deal? Retailers like JCPenney use coupons to offer their shoppers great-looking deals, but there’s a catch: Before putting an item on sale, a store often first raises its price.

In this lesson, students reason with percents and proportions to evaluate enticing coupons and debate whether retailers should be allowed to raise the price of items in order to then put them on sale.

REAL WORLD TAKEAWAYS

  • Stores often inflate sticker prices so that they can offer big discounts to customers.
  • People have emotional or gut reactions to special offers; the same price can feel different depending on the “deal.”
  • When famous retailer JCPenney implemented a “Fair and Square” pricing policy through which it reduced sticker prices and mostly eliminated coupons, sales plummeted.

MATH OBJECTIVES

  • Use percents to calculate sale prices after a discount
  • Given a new price and a percent discount, use proportional reasoning to determine the original price

This complex task is best as a culminating unit activity after students have developed formal knowledge and conceptual understanding.
Lesson gauge advanced
Grade 7
Percents & Proportions
Lesson gauge advanced
Grade 7
Percents & Proportions
Content Standards 7.RP.3 Use proportional relationships to solve multistep ratio and percent problems. Examples: simple interest, tax, markups and markdowns, gratuities and commissions, fees, percent increase and decrease, percent error. 7.EE.4 Use variables to represent quantities in a real-world or mathematical problem, and construct simple equations and inequalities to solve problems by reasoning about the quantities. (a) Solve word problems leading to equations of the form px + q = r and p(x + q) = r, where p, q, and r are specific rational numbers. Solve equations of these forms fluently. Compare an algebraic solution to an arithmetic solution, identifying the sequence of the operations used in each approach. For example, the perimeter of a rectangle is 54 cm. Its length is 6 cm. What is its width? (b) Solve word problems leading to inequalities of the form px + q > r or px + q < r, where p, q, and r are specific rational numbers. Graph the solution set of the inequality and interpret it in the context of the problem. For example: As a salesperson, you are paid $50 per week plus $3 per sale. This week you want your pay to be at least $100. Write an inequality for the number of sales you need to make, and describe the solutions.
Mathematical Practices MP.2 Reason abstractly and quantitatively. MP.3 Construct viable arguments and critique the reasoning of others.

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