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1600 Pennsylvania

How big is the White House?

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1600 Pennsylvania

How big is the White House?

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Snkun8%3d&expires=1638269667
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How big is the White House? 1600 Pennsylvania Avenue is one of the most famous addresses in the world. Not only is the White House the home of the Executive Branch, it’s also a physical representation of America.

In this lesson, students build scale models of the White House, compare scaling in one vs. two vs. three dimensions and design their ideal version of the president’s house.

REAL WORLD TAKEAWAYS

  • The White House is a symbol of America. Decorating it can be one way to celebrate American values.

MATH OBJECTIVES

  • Determine a scale factor and use a scale model
  • Calculate the area of rectangles
  • Use nets to find the surface area of an object
  • Reason about volume

Appropriate most times as students are developing conceptual understanding.
Lesson gauge medium
Grade 6
Area/SA/Volume
Lesson gauge medium
Grade 6
Area/SA/Volume
Content Standards 6.RP.3 Use ratio and rate reasoning to solve real-world and mathematical problems, e.g., by reasoning about tables of equivalent ratios, tape diagrams, double number line diagrams, or equations. (a) Make tables of equivalent ratios relating quantities with whole- number measurements, find missing values in the tables, and plot the pairs of values on the coordinate plane. Use tables to compare ratios. (b) Solve unit rate problems including those involving unit pricing and constant speed. For example, if it took 7 hours to mow 4 lawns, then at that rate, how many lawns could be mowed in 35 hours? At what rate were lawns being mowed? (c) Find a percent of a quantity as a rate per 100 (e.g., 30% of a quantity means 30/100 times the quantity); solve problems involving finding the whole, given a part and the percent. (d) Use ratio reasoning to convert measurement units; manipulate and transform units appropriately when multiplying or dividing quantities. 6.G.2 Find the volume of a right rectangular prism with fractional edge lengths by packing it with unit cubes of the appropriate unit fraction edge lengths, and show that the volume is the same as would be found by multiplying the edge lengths of the prism. Apply the formulas V = l w h and V = b h to find volumes of right rectangular prisms with fractional edge lengths in the context of solving real-world and mathematical problems. 6.G.4 Represent three-dimensional figures using nets made up of rectangles and triangles, and use the nets to find the surface area of these figures. Apply these techniques in the context of solving real-world and mathematical problems. 7.G.1 Solve problems involving scale drawings of geometric figures, including computing actual lengths and areas from a scale drawing and reproducing a scale drawing at a different scale. 7.G.6 Solve real-world and mathematical problems involving area, volume and surface area of two- and three-dimensional objects composed of triangles, quadrilaterals, polygons, cubes, and right prisms.
Mathematical Practices MP.5 Use appropriate tools strategically. MP.6 Attend to precision. MP.7 Look for and make use of structure.

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